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Posts Tagged ‘HIV medications’

The topic this Wednesday March 6, 2013 is Complimentary and Alternative Medicine.    I’m basing this on the 2012 HIV Treatment Guide in HIV Plus Magazine, July/August 2012 issue, page 22.   Click Here

We will discuss Acupuncture, Chinese Bitter Melon, Collodial Silver, Manganese, Massage, Vitamins, Prayer, Reflexology, Yoga, Zinc and others you may tried.

Steve

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Topic this Wednesday, August 22, 2012 is When to start HIV Medications.

Based on this article from TheBody.com

Based on this article: CLICK HERE 

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Santa Baby

December 21, 2011

Wednesday Night will have a “Dirty Santa” AND a Xmas Buffet the Wednesday (December 21, 2011) before Xmas.

Each person is to bring at least one wrapped gift (value $5.00-$10.00) and a small appetizer or dessert.

Also bring a small food item, preferably an appetizer or dessert.   This is not supposed to be a large buffet dinner.  Just a snacks.

 

Steve

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Santa today

December 21, 2011

By popular vote, we will have a “Dirty Santa” AND a Xmas Buffet the Wednesday (December 21, 2011) before Xmas.

Each person is to bring at least one wrapped gift (value $5.00-$10.00) and a small appetizer or dessert.   If you can afford to bring 2 gifts, please do, so that anyone new or who doesn’t see this email, will be able to participate in the gift exchange.

Also bring a small food item, preferably an appetizer or dessert.   This is not supposed to be a large buffet dinner.  Just a snack.

Dirty Santa Rules will follow.

Santa in his 20's

Steve

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 December 21, 2011

By popular vote, we will have a “Dirty Santa” AND a Xmas Buffet the Wednesday (December 21, 2011) before Xmas.

Each person is to bring at least one wrapped gift (value $5.00-$10.00) and a small appetizer or dessert.   If you can afford to bring 2 gifts, please do, so that anyone new or who doesn’t see this email, will be able to participate in the gift exchange.

Also bring a small food item, preferably an appetizer or dessert.   This is not supposed to be a large buffet dinner.  Just a snack.

Dirty Santa Rules will follow.

 

Steve

 

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 December 14, 2011

This Wednesday, our guest speaker is DJ Jimmy P who will present

DISCO: Our Music / Our Lives

A look at music history in gay culture in thru the eyes of DJ JimmyP in NYC.

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 December 07, 2011

This Wednesday, our guest speaker is DJ Jimmy P who will present

DISCO: Our Music / Our Lives

A look at music history in gay culture in thru the eyes of DJ JimmyP in NYC.

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The topic this Wednesday is side effects. What side effects have you had with your HIV medicines?

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The Washington Post reported that treating people with HIV drugs sharply cuts risk of transmission to other people. LINK to Article We’ve been discussing this in the Wednesday group for many years. Lower viral loads reduce risk of transmission. A prvious Swiss study stated that an undetetectable viral load was non-infectious and other studies have stated that viral loads less than 1,500 or even 3,500 are low risk.

HIV drugs sharply cut risk of transmission, study finds
By David Brown, Published: May 12
AIDS researchers announced Thursday that a study conducted in nine countries has proved the long-standing hunch that HIV-infected people on treatment are much less likely to transmit the virus than people who aren’t taking the drugs.

The study, which was stopped early because the results were so dramatic, found that men and women whose sexual partners were infected with the AIDS virus were almost completely protected if the partner took a combination of HIV-suppressing drugs.

The study provides evidence — useful in American cities and African villages — that getting HIV-infected people on treatment early, long before they have symptoms, may be the best strategy for slowing the 30-year-old epidemic. The District has the highest infection rate of any American city, on a par with that of Rwanda.

“This is far beyond expectation. It could completely change the way we are dealing with the epidemic,” said Michel Sidibe, head of UNAIDS, the United Nations’ AIDS program.

“This is data that you can’t ignore,” said Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which paid for the $78 million experiment.

Condoms, behavior change, clean hypodermic needles and a safe blood supply are the chief tools for preventing HIV infection. However, since the arrival of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996, there has been a lot of indirect evidence that treatment is a tool for prevention.

The reason is simple. ART, three or more drugs taken every day, prevents the AIDS virus from replicating, and it rapidly disappears from blood and other bodily fluids that are the usual vehicles for infection.

The idea that treatment could be preventive was seen in studies of “discordant” couples — one partner infected, the other not — in Kenya. Researchers observed that when an infected person was in treatment, the partner was at much less risk of becoming infected. This observation held for whole populations.

Researchers in British Columbia last year reported that the rate of new infection for the entire province declined after a policy of widespread HIV testing and early treatment was adopted.

What was missing was evidence from a randomized, controlled trial — the gold standard of medical research — that treatment had a clearly preventive effect.

The new study enrolled 1,763 couples in five African countries, as well as Brazil, India, Thailand and the United States. Nearly all were heterosexual. The researchers wanted to include large numbers of gay men but were unsuccessful in recruiting them, possibly because they were already convinced that treatment reduces transmission.

All of the volunteers had a CD4 cell count of 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter of blood — evidence of mild damage to the immune system.

In half of the couples, the infected person immediately went on ART. In the other half, the medicines weren’t started until the infection became more severe, as evidenced by a fall of the CD4 count below 250. All were advised to use condoms.

Over the next four years, 28 people acquired HIV from their partner. (Gene fingerprinting of the virus revealed that in 11 other cases, people became infected by someone other than their regular partner.) Of those 28 new infections, 27 occurred among couples in which the HIV-infected partner had not started taking antiretroviral drugs at the start of the study. That amounted to a 96 percent reduction in the risk of acquiring HIV in the couples in which the infected partner was on ART.

Significantly, 17 of the 27 infections occurred in couples in which the infected partner’s CD4 count was greater than 350. The World Health Organization’s guidelines call for starting ART when the count dips below 350. This study shows that having a partner whose CD4 count is above that cutoff is no assurance the person won’t transmit the virus.

The leader of the study, Myron Cohen of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said the results are “probably generalizable” to all heterosexuals. But that’s not absolutely certain.

The study marks a further swing of the pendulum back toward the once-popular and later discredited HIV treatment strategy known as “hit hard, hit early.”

Prescribing ART long before an infected person has symptoms or evidence of severe immune system damage was popular until it became clear the drugs could have serious side effects. (They can damage nerves, raise blood cholesterol and change the distribution of body fat). More recent evidence shows that putting off treatment for too long increases the risk of early death.

Although it is now clear that ART protects a person’s partner, what isn’t certain is whether ART benefits the patient when it’s started soon after infection and before the immune system is measurably damaged. A study designed to answer that question recently started but won’t be finished for several years.

Some AIDS experts fear the new study may be used to browbeat newly infected people into starting ART earlier than they might otherwise.

“I can imagine people deciding to get treatment because they are in a relationship and they want to protect the partner. But if a person has a CD4 count of 800, it is wrong to mislead people that they will benefit when we really don’t know,” said Joseph A. Sonnabend, 78, a retired physician and researcher previously affiliated with St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City.

Like many cities with a high AIDS prevalence, the District has an aggressive policy of testing for HIV infection and urging infected people to enter care.

As of Dec. 31, 2008, the most recent year for which data are available, 16,513 city residents were living with HIV. About 3.2 percent of people older than 12 in the city are thought to be infected.

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Antabuse to flush HIV resevoir

Antabuse is a drug used to treat alcoholism. It makes people who drink alcohol become ill therefore helping them stop drinking.

There’s a new clinical trial underway to use Antabuse (disulfiram) to flush out the hidden reservoir of HIV that evades both the immune system and antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. The trial is small and isn’t attempting to cure the participants, it could be a new path to a cure.

Current HIV drug therapy only works on active cells. Inactive cells hide out in resevoirs preventing the drugs from attacking them. Antabuse not only makes people sick from alcolhol, it also activates cells which would then allow the immune system and the HIV drugs to destroy them.

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