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Posts Tagged ‘Hep C’

This Wednesday 05-02-2012 the topic is

Hepatitis C

our Guest speaker is:

Dr. Dominic Riganotti

Hepatitis C

  1. What is Hepatitis C?  What is it that is infective?
  2. What are the numbers…how many people are infected?….lets talk
  3. How could I get Hep C?  What’s the sources of infection?
  4. Disease stats…what happens to infected people?  Does everyone get sick?
  5. Is it just one type of virus?  Are some worse than others?
  6. What are the symptoms I can watch out for if I get infected?
  7. Where does the virus go in my body after it infects me?
  8. What’s the worst that could happen?
  9. What’s the treatment?
  10. How long is the treatment?
  11. Will it cure me?
  12. Will it make any of my other problems worse?
Wilton Manors Center for Infectious Disease & Immunology
Dr. Dominic Riganotti
Wilton Executive Suites
Infectious Diseases & Immunology
2312 Wilton Drive
HIV Care & Disease Management  
Wilton Manors, FL 33305
954.745.6874

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This Wednesday 05-02-2012 the topic is

Hepatitis C

our Guest speaker is:

Dr. Dominic Riganotti

Hepatitis C

  1. What is Hepatitis C?  What is it that is infective?
  2. What are the numbers…how many people are infected?….lets talk
  3. How could I get Hep C?  What’s the sources of infection?
  4. Disease stats…what happens to infected people?  Does everyone get sick?
  5. Is it just one type of virus?  Are some worse than others?
  6. What are the symptoms I can watch out for if I get infected?
  7. Where does the virus go in my body after it infects me?
  8. What’s the worst that could happen?
  9. What’s the treatment?
  10. How long is the treatment?
  11. Will it cure me?
  12. Will it make any of my other problems worse?
Wilton Manors Center for Infectious Disease & Immunology
Dr. Dominic Riganotti
Wilton Executive Suites
Infectious Diseases & Immunology
2312 Wilton Drive
HIV Care & Disease Management  
Wilton Manors, FL 33305
954.745.6874

Read Full Post »

This Wednesday 05-02-2012 the topic is

Hepatitis C

our Guest speaker is:

Dr. Dominic Riganotti

Hepatitis C

  1. What is Hepatitis C?  What is it that is infective?
  2. What are the numbers…how many people are infected?….lets talk
  3. How could I get Hep C?  What’s the sources of infection?
  4. Disease stats…what happens to infected people?  Does everyone get sick?
  5. Is it just one type of virus?  Are some worse than others?
  6. What are the symptoms I can watch out for if I get infected?
  7. Where does the virus go in my body after it infects me?
  8. What’s the worst that could happen?
  9. What’s the treatment?
  10. How long is the treatment?
  11. Will it cure me?
  12. Will it make any of my other problems worse?
Wilton Manors Center for Infectious Disease & Immunology
Dr. Dominic Riganotti
Wilton Executive Suites
Infectious Diseases & Immunology
2312 Wilton Drive
HIV Care & Disease Management  
Wilton Manors, FL 33305
954.745.6874

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I would like to announce and invite you to attend the ABCs of Hep and Health. On Thursday, June 23rd at 7pm (6:30 for refreshments) Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. James T. Dwyer and BioScript pharmacists Diona Libonati and Daniel Elmore will give the community an educational presentation examining Hepatitis A, B, & C, Co-infection with HIV and the latest treatments. See attachment. Please forward this information to your colleagues and clients. I look forward to seeing you all!

Michael Childers

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From Poz magazine, there is an article in the March issue about Telaprevir, the first protease inhibitor (PI) for treatment of hepatitisC, that’s awaiting FDA approval. Telaprevir has proven effective in people with hard-to-treat hep-C genotype 1. In trials, adding telaprevir to standard hep-C treatment (peglated interferon plus ribavirin) shortened treatment time and cleared the virus.

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HIV-Positive Men Who Bareback Should Have More Frequent Hep C Testing

Some key points from article:

A new study has found that 75 percent of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in HIV-positive men occurred in those with no history of injection drug use (IDU)

Because of shared transmission routes, up to 30 percent of people with HIV in the United States also have chronic HCV infection. Chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death in people with HIV, and people coinfected with both HIV and HCV are also at a higher risk of death from a number of non-liver-related diseases, including kidney disease.

The majority of HCV cases in the United States are attributable to injection drug use, but there have been reports of HCV transmission in MSM who have no IDU history. Studies of these cases have suggested that HCV risk in these individuals is associated with various sexual practices, including unprotected anal intercourse, the use of sex toys, multiple partners and fisting.

In those studies, barebacking, coinfection with syphilis, and sex that is traumatic to the anus were highly associated with HCV infection in those with no IDU history.

Regular screening for HCV is crucial for two reasons.
1. Many who develop chronic HCV infections do not exhibit symptoms until they are quite ill years later.
2. When people are able to catch their HCV infection early—within a few weeks or months after exposure—HCV treatment is far more likely to work.

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Human HIV drug trial near

CD4 T-cells are one measurement of the body’s immune system. Another cell that fights infections are called Natural Killer Cells (NK). These are a kind of white blood cell that play a major role in the rejection of tumors and cells infected with viruses.

But they don’t seem to attack cells infected with HIV and that has puzzled scientists for more than two decades. This article explains how HIV produces a protein called Vpu which basically neutralizes the NK cells preventing them from attacking the infected cells.

This new drug, BIT225, targets the Vpu protein of HIV which would then allow the NK cells to do their job. Which means this would be a new class of drugs in the fight against HIV.

“An Australian biomedical research company, Biotron Ltd, already has a drug that specifically targets the Vpu protein of HIV.

The discovery has excited Australian biomedical research company Biotron Ltd which has a drug that specifically targets the Vpu protein of HIV.

The drug has passed through early safety trials, and the company hopes to implement an efficacy trial with HIV-positive patients in the near future.

“This study is really important for Biotron,” said Biotron CEO Dr Michelle Miller.

“We have been working on developing drugs to target the Vpu protein of HIV for several years and, until recently, there has been very little known about exactly how Vpu works, despite good evidence that it is critical to the process of establishing HIV infections in specific cell types.”

From their company web site:

Based on the company info for Biotron, they have an efficacy trial in the works. Looks like there should be a definitive answer in about two years, to how well the treatment might work in humans.

This is a snip from their investor PDF. Looks like their avenue of research is at least promising (not just another ARV). Given the Rush Univ publication, I would think funding will now not be a problem. Because recent studies have shown that if you are adherent to your meds, the chance of resistance is extremely low, investors no longer see new HIV drugs worth the $$$. That’s why this recent news is so important. Otherwise this trial may have come up empty looking for scarce public funding.

• First-in-class new anti-HIV drug
• New mode of action – inhibits budding of virus from infected cells
• Targets HIV in viral reservoirs in vivo
• Reservoirs are last of the holy grail in HIV
• No existing drugs target this source of HIV in the body
• Eradication of reservoirs is essential for “cure” of HIV
• Phase Ib/IIa trial protocols finalised
• 12 – 20 subject trial in HIV+ patients
•Trial designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept i.e. can reduce HIV
loads in HIV-infected reservoir cells in man
• Expected to commence once funding in place

Additional links on related information:

News releases on the drug:

New class of drug in offering

http://www.biospectrumasia.com/content/251110AUS14722.asp

International study supports Biotron’s HIV drug approach

Biotron Presentation to Investors explaining drug’s importance

We will talk about this drug in the second half of the 12-15-2010 Wednesday group meeting.

-Steve

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FDA NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release: June 25, 2010
Media Inquiries: Erica Jefferson, 301-796-4988, erica.jefferson@fda.hhs.gov
Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA

FDA Approves Rapid Test for Antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced approval of the first rapid blood test for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) for individuals 15 years and older.

The OraQuick HCV Rapid Antibody Test is used to test individuals who are at risk for infection with HCV and people with signs or symptoms of hepatitis. HCV is transmitted through exposure to infected blood, which, for example, can occur during intravenous drug use. The virus can also be transferred from an infected mother to her child. Hepatitis C can lead to liver inflammation and dysfunction and, over time, to liver disease and liver cancer.

OraQuick is a test strip and does not require an instrument for diagnosis. It takes about 20 minutes to obtain results from the test.

“Approval of OraQuick means that more patients can be notified of their HCV infection faster so that they can consult with their physicians for appropriate health measures,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Getting faster treatment is an important public health step to control this dangerous disease.”

OraQuick is not approved for HCV screening of the general population.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are approximately 3.2 million people in the United States chronically infected with HCV and each year, about 17,000 people are newly infected. Chronic HCV infection is a leading reason for a liver transplants in the United States and HCV is associated with an estimated 12,000 deaths annually. Approximately 75 to 85 percent of people who become infected with the hepatitis C virus develop chronic infection.

OraQuick is manufactured by Bethlehem, Penn.-based OraSure Technologies Inc.

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25 guys showed up to talk about POZ Dating and where to meet men.

The subject immediately turned to the internet. Someone mentioned that most relationships (straight or gay) now begin online and Gay men are probably ahead of the curve on this. We listed the different online sites and talked about their advantages and disadvantages. Some sites were free, some charged and some asked for donations for special priveleges. Some sites had scam problems with people asking money. Some sites seemed to be more geared towards drug hookups. Some sites were bigger overseas than here. Some sites were somewhat useless. But, it was generally agreed that each site could be used for immediate hook-ups, dating or finding a relationship. It depends on how you use the site. Lying about your status on-line was a big turn-off to the group, more so than lying about your stats. If you have problems with declarirng your HIV status, leave it blank or say “Ask Me”. But lying is a terrible way to initiate a relationship, even a hook-up.

It was noted that Facebook is used by your relatives, friends and employers, both current and future, so be careful what you post here. The difference with Facebook is that you normally post your real name.

Eventually, we made it to off-line places to meet guys. Anywhere in Wilton Manors or Greater Ft Lauderdale Metro are places you can meet guys. But it was agreed that Clubs and Organizations where you can meet guys with similar interests might be a better place to meet relationship material.

Few guys seemed to be meeting people in bars anymore. Not sure why, maybe our group is just over the bar scene. But it was mentioned that it was easier to disclose your status at an Online site. There seemed to be a safer feeling online and the feeling of not wasting time on someone who was not comfortable with an HIV status. Online, it’s can be just out there as be used as one of the first filters. In the bars, it’s something you disclose after you’ve spent time with someone.

After the break, we discussed the Hepatitis A and B vaccine which is available free from the Broward County Health Department for High-Risk individuals, which includes HIV+ and Gay men. 954-759-5456. There is no vaccine for Hepatitis-C. More information on Hep-C and the vaccines can be found at the Hepatitis Tab.

Discussion then turned to the surveyjust released by AIDS Care: Majority of gay men support HIV transmission laws. There is general confusion between transmission laws and disclosure laws and even this suvey seemed to not understand the difference as the first sentence contradicted the title: “Two-thirds of US gay men believe that it should be illegal for an HIV-positive man to have unprotected anal sex without disclosure“.

In Florida, our law makes no difference between protected and unprotected nor does it distinguish between anal or any other kind of sex. It does state that you’re only bound to disclose if you know your status and we discussed whether this might be a barrier to some men from getting tested.

As usual, there was a wide variety of opinions on these issues which most people defended passionately. That’s what a discussion group is all about. As we state in every meeting, “not everyone thinks alike, and that’s OK.”

After Group, 10 of us went to Peter Pan for something to eat.

-Steve

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After attending the Hepatitis class on Monday 09-27-2010, I learned some valuable information, I’d like to share with you.

People with HIV are at HIGH-RISK for Hepatitis, A, B and C. 30% of people with HIV are coinfected with Hep-C.

There are vaccinations available for Hepatitis-A and Hepatitis-B, but there is NO vaccination for Hepatitis-C.

Both Hep-A and Hep-B vaccinations have proven safe and effective and you can get them at the same time – it’s easy. Hepatitis-A requires 2 shots and Hepatitis-B requires 3 shots. You need to complete all the shots to become vaccinated, but it’s never too late too finish the series if you miss a shot.

Most health plans will pay for Hepatitis A and B vaccines for adults at high-risk. Both Gay men and HIV Positive people are high-risk. If you don’t have insurance or your insurance will not cover these vaccines, The Broward County Health Department will provide them for free. Just call the Hepatitis Hotline, tell them you are at high-risk and make an appointment, 954-759-5456.

I created a Tab for Hepatitis because I think this is something we need to address more in the HIV Positive Community and make ourselves aware of the risks.

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