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Archive for the ‘Inspiration’ Category

FRIDAY MOVIE:  NOV. 17

BPM – BEATS PER MINUTE  

(An AIDS ACT-UP Docu-Drama)

Image result for bpm movie.

 

bpmimage

 

GATEWAY THEATRE

STARTS 7 PM

********

After Movie We Walk to:

BIG LOUIE’S PIZZERIA (1990 E Sunrise)

(Meet there at 9:15 if not going to movie)

 

*********

 

CLICK HERE FOR PREVIEW

.

About the Movie

In Paris in the early 1990s, a group of activists goes to battle for those stricken with HIV/AIDS, taking on sluggish government agencies and major pharmaceutical companies in bold, invasive actions. The organization is ACT UP, and its members, many of them gay and HIV-positive, embrace their mission with a literal life-or-death urgency. Amid rallies, protests, fierce debates and ecstatic dance parties, the newcomer Nathan falls in love with Sean, the group’s radical firebrand, and their passion sparks against the shadow of mortality as the activists fight for a breakthrough..

 

Image result for bpm movie

 

REVIEW:

 

Photo: Momento Film

The title of the stark French AIDS-crisis drama BPM stands for “beats per minute,” which can evoke a heartbeat or a discotheque, both of which figure in the film. What you also might think of is a clock ticking down, as the main characters — virtually all of them HIV-positive — rage against the dying of the light. Directed and co-written (with Philippe Mangeot) by the Morocco-born Robin Campillo, the film takes place in 1989 and centers on the Paris branch of ACT UP, whose members devise stunts to call attention to government’s and pharmaceutical companies’ foot-dragging in the fight against a near-genocidal epidemic. Along with that rage is a coming-together that has resonated through the intervening decades.

.

The movie opens with a stunt, an onstage assault on a health secretary who, at least on a surface level, appears to be doing his best. That’s one of the most unsettling aspects of BPM: At first glance, the “villains” don’t seem villainous, while the “heroes” can be frightening. The health secretary attempts to engage the protesters in conversation, only to be smashed in the face with a fake-blood balloon and handcuffed to a railing. Later, the group defaces a drug-company office, hissing at a doctor who says he feels their pain. ACT UP is, after all, about acting up, being rude and inappropriate. Looking back, we know a drug cocktail would eventually be concocted that keeps people alive a long time. But no one knew it then. All they knew was … nothing, really. Rumors of drug trials. The occasional supportive word from a mayor or governor or president — though not, of course, in the U.S. under Reagan and not in New York, where the closeted Ed Koch’s fear of aligning himself with gays kept AIDS off the political agenda. All the members of ACT UP know is that friends and lovers are sprouting lesions, weakening, and dying in agony.

.

You understand those stakes when Campillo depicts ACT UP meetings in a vertical classroom, where members aren’t allowed to clap or cheer — only to use finger snaps to signal their agreement or approval. It’s an eerie sound, more haunting than applause, because those snaps don’t reverberate. They’re more urgent than handclaps, but in a void. The group’s leader, Thibault (Antoine Reinartz), has the task of entertaining wildly disparate ideas for future demonstrations and slogans. He must mediate between people who want more violence and people who want less. He also has to reach out to drug companies for reports of trials while making sure no one in the group mistakes him for a diplomat. His evident second-in-command, Sophie (Adèle Haenel), is generally on the side of the chaos-makers. Against this are segments of the Paris gay community that think ACT UP is made up of a bunch of killjoy malcontents.

.

The first half of BPM is chill, impersonal, doubtlessly intentional given Campillo’s focus on the collective rather than the individual. But a central pair emerges. Nahuel Perez Biscayart and Arnaud Valois are Sean and Nathan, whose love affair interrupts the flow of meetings and demonstrations. Sean became infected at 16, via his first encounter, and will probably die before 20. He’s among the fiercest of ACT UP’s members, the one who feels the need to do damage most insistently. It’s Nathan who listens to him, tempers him (to a point), and gives him the kind of love he never had. Campillo isn’t as resourceful in their bedroom scenes. His camera loiters and the action is generalized — he loses the dramatic beat. But we’re with the movie by this point. And we’re hungry for a sense of intimacy in a world of public declarations.

.

The most curious elements of BPM are its act-ending disco interludes — streaky, throbbing, sometimes intercut with microscopic views of cells. My guess is that they’re there as a reminder that the AIDS crisis was a cruel, shattering end to an age of abandon (and promiscuity), one that marked gays’ public declaration of independence from having to hide in the shadows for so long. To borrow the title of another movie, these were the true last days of disco.

.

BPM is vital for the history it depicts, but it’s also important in the here and now, as a testament to public action — even messy, not-always-effective public action. The characters look around and see their society functioning smoothly, as if there wasn’t a plague in its midst. Comparisons to the present are always dangerous, but let’s live dangerously: The very ecosystem is collapsing around us, with omens coming faster and faster of the catastrophe to come. We should watch BPM and ask, “How disruptive are we willing to be?”

 

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FRIDAY MOVIE:  NOV. 17

BPM – BEATS PER MINUTE  

(An AIDS ACT-UP Docu-Drama)

Image result for bpm movie.

 

bpmimage

 

GATEWAY THEATRE

STARTS 7 PM

********

After Movie We Walk to:

BIG LOUIE’S PIZZERIA (1990 E Sunrise)

(Meet there at 9:15 if not going to movie)

 

*********

 

CLICK HERE FOR PREVIEW

.

About the Movie

In Paris in the early 1990s, a group of activists goes to battle for those stricken with HIV/AIDS, taking on sluggish government agencies and major pharmaceutical companies in bold, invasive actions. The organization is ACT UP, and its members, many of them gay and HIV-positive, embrace their mission with a literal life-or-death urgency. Amid rallies, protests, fierce debates and ecstatic dance parties, the newcomer Nathan falls in love with Sean, the group’s radical firebrand, and their passion sparks against the shadow of mortality as the activists fight for a breakthrough..

 

Image result for bpm movie

 

REVIEW:

 

Photo: Momento Film

The title of the stark French AIDS-crisis drama BPM stands for “beats per minute,” which can evoke a heartbeat or a discotheque, both of which figure in the film. What you also might think of is a clock ticking down, as the main characters — virtually all of them HIV-positive — rage against the dying of the light. Directed and co-written (with Philippe Mangeot) by the Morocco-born Robin Campillo, the film takes place in 1989 and centers on the Paris branch of ACT UP, whose members devise stunts to call attention to government’s and pharmaceutical companies’ foot-dragging in the fight against a near-genocidal epidemic. Along with that rage is a coming-together that has resonated through the intervening decades.

.

The movie opens with a stunt, an onstage assault on a health secretary who, at least on a surface level, appears to be doing his best. That’s one of the most unsettling aspects of BPM: At first glance, the “villains” don’t seem villainous, while the “heroes” can be frightening. The health secretary attempts to engage the protesters in conversation, only to be smashed in the face with a fake-blood balloon and handcuffed to a railing. Later, the group defaces a drug-company office, hissing at a doctor who says he feels their pain. ACT UP is, after all, about acting up, being rude and inappropriate. Looking back, we know a drug cocktail would eventually be concocted that keeps people alive a long time. But no one knew it then. All they knew was … nothing, really. Rumors of drug trials. The occasional supportive word from a mayor or governor or president — though not, of course, in the U.S. under Reagan and not in New York, where the closeted Ed Koch’s fear of aligning himself with gays kept AIDS off the political agenda. All the members of ACT UP know is that friends and lovers are sprouting lesions, weakening, and dying in agony.

.

You understand those stakes when Campillo depicts ACT UP meetings in a vertical classroom, where members aren’t allowed to clap or cheer — only to use finger snaps to signal their agreement or approval. It’s an eerie sound, more haunting than applause, because those snaps don’t reverberate. They’re more urgent than handclaps, but in a void. The group’s leader, Thibault (Antoine Reinartz), has the task of entertaining wildly disparate ideas for future demonstrations and slogans. He must mediate between people who want more violence and people who want less. He also has to reach out to drug companies for reports of trials while making sure no one in the group mistakes him for a diplomat. His evident second-in-command, Sophie (Adèle Haenel), is generally on the side of the chaos-makers. Against this are segments of the Paris gay community that think ACT UP is made up of a bunch of killjoy malcontents.

.

The first half of BPM is chill, impersonal, doubtlessly intentional given Campillo’s focus on the collective rather than the individual. But a central pair emerges. Nahuel Perez Biscayart and Arnaud Valois are Sean and Nathan, whose love affair interrupts the flow of meetings and demonstrations. Sean became infected at 16, via his first encounter, and will probably die before 20. He’s among the fiercest of ACT UP’s members, the one who feels the need to do damage most insistently. It’s Nathan who listens to him, tempers him (to a point), and gives him the kind of love he never had. Campillo isn’t as resourceful in their bedroom scenes. His camera loiters and the action is generalized — he loses the dramatic beat. But we’re with the movie by this point. And we’re hungry for a sense of intimacy in a world of public declarations.

.

The most curious elements of BPM are its act-ending disco interludes — streaky, throbbing, sometimes intercut with microscopic views of cells. My guess is that they’re there as a reminder that the AIDS crisis was a cruel, shattering end to an age of abandon (and promiscuity), one that marked gays’ public declaration of independence from having to hide in the shadows for so long. To borrow the title of another movie, these were the true last days of disco.

.

BPM is vital for the history it depicts, but it’s also important in the here and now, as a testament to public action — even messy, not-always-effective public action. The characters look around and see their society functioning smoothly, as if there wasn’t a plague in its midst. Comparisons to the present are always dangerous, but let’s live dangerously: The very ecosystem is collapsing around us, with omens coming faster and faster of the catastrophe to come. We should watch BPM and ask, “How disruptive are we willing to be?”

 

Read Full Post »

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FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE 2-3-17

BEARCITY 3

A Gay Comedy

CLICK HERE FOR PREVIEW

Image result for bearcity 3

GATEWAY THEATRE (SUNRISE AND US 1)

STARTS AT 7:30   Meet inside lobby around 7

BearCity 3 (2016)

Plot Summary

  • After a continuing losing streak that started at the altar, Roger tries to claw out of financial ruin and into the arms of Tyler. But Jay, Ty’s hunky Fire Chief partner is not letting that flame blaze. Meanwhile, fireworks explode when Fred’s obsessive tinkering on their bear documentary conflicts with Brent’s baby prep and the unwavering due date of their new born. Mama Bear Michael faces major challenges and finds that love comes in all colors, shapes and sizes. Join us as we take one final adventure into the woods with the BearCity gang, where romance can sometimes be hairy but ultimately worth every hilarious, sometimes painful and all-consuming moment.

    Written by The BearCity Team

Synopsis

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Director:

Douglas Langway

Writer:

Douglas Langway

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The Gay Men’s Chorus of South Florida’s Christmas concert, Heaven and Nature Sing, will be broadcast on WLRN television: December 22nd @ 9PM, December 24th @ 8PM and December 25th @ 7PM.

If you missed their highly entertaining and amazing performances that were sold out recently, here’s your chance to enjoy the magic. Comcast is channels 17 (regular) and 487 (digital).

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THE GAY MEN’S CHORUS OF SOUTH FLORIDA is having a concert on Friday, December 13th.  The Concert is at the Sunshine Cathedral and begins at 8 PM. This concert on Dec. 13 is being designated as our FRIDAY NIGHT EVENT FOR THE GROUP.
 
The link to buy tickets is: www.gmcsf.org.   
Individual tickets are $35 . Individual tickets go on sale this SUNDAY October 20th.  Until that time, only season’s tickets are available.
 
 
Heaven and Nature Sing – December 13, 14, 20, 21, 2013 
Join the men of the chorus for what has become one of Broward County’s musical holiday traditions. Listen to the powerful sounds of one hundred fifty male voices performing some of your holiday favorites, beautiful and inspiring selections from the classical Christmas repertoire. Be entertained as the chorus makes the Yuletide “gay” as only they can. A musical treat sure to put even Scrooge in the holiday mood!  chorus

 

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BE PART OF THIS EXCITING EXPERIENCE

Get involved in discussing the urgent issues affecting the LGBTQA community at this interactive theatre performance.
 
SAVE LIVES – PREVENT SUICIDE.
Expressions of HOPE PROJECT
 
FOR TICKETS:
CALL 954-384-0344 or at www.fisponlineorg
Adults $10 – Seniors $7 – Students $5
 
OCTOBER 13, 2013
2 PM at THE PRIDE CENTER
 
OCTOBER 17, 2013
7 PM at the HAGEN PARK COMMUNITY CENTER
 
 FinalFlyerwithlogoNotAlone

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