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This Web Site is meant to share information of HIV Gay life in South Florida as we know it. By using this website, you agree that you have read the Website Disclaimer and agree to the exclusions and limitations of liability set out in the Website Disclaimer are reasonable.

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PositiveAttitudes

 

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FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE SPECIAL

FEB. 24, 2017  –  7 PM

at WORLD AIDS MUSEUM  

1201 NE 26th Street, Wilton Manors

UNITED IN ANGER – A HISTORY OF ACT UP

After movie we will go to Eat/Drink*: 

ROSIE’S – 2449 Wilton Drive

*JOIN US FOR THE MOVIE OR JUST TO EAT 

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United in Anger: A History of ACT UP is an inspiring documentary about the birth and life of the AIDS activist movement from the perspective of the people in the trenches fighting the epidemic. Utilizing oral histories of members of ACT UP, as well as rare archival footage, the film depicts the efforts of ACT UP as it battles corporate greed, social indifference, and government neglect.

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MEET THE MAN WHO STARTED ACT UP 

LARRY KRAMER  –  MARCH 9 and 10

Buy Tickets Online:http://www.worldaidsmuseum.org

54d4cc48-0e30-4c6e-b31b-73db375c052b

FRIDAY MOVIE SPECIAL

FEB. 24, 2017  –  7 PM

AT WORLD AIDS MUSEUM  

1201 NE 26th Street, Wilton Manors

UNITED IN ANGER – A HISTORY OF ACT UP

After movie we will go to Eat/Drink: 

ROSIE’S – 2449 Wilton Drive

JOIN US FOR THE MOVIE OR JUST TO EAT 

***************************

United in Anger: A History of ACT UP is an inspiring documentary about the birth and life of the AIDS activist movement from the perspective of the people in the trenches fighting the epidemic. Utilizing oral histories of members of ACT UP, as well as rare archival footage, the film depicts the efforts of ACT UP as it battles corporate greed, social indifference, and government neglect.

img_0031

MEET THE MAN WHO STARTED ACT UP 

LARRY KRAMER  –  MARCH 9 and 10

Buy Tickets Online: http://www.worldaidsmuseum.org

54d4cc48-0e30-4c6e-b31b-73db375c052b

FRIDAY MOVIE SPECIAL

FEB. 24, 2017  –  7 PM

AT WORLD AIDS MUSEUM  

1201 ne 26th Street, Wilton Manors

UNITED IN ANGER – A HISTORY OF ACT UP

After movie we will go to Eat/Drink: 

ROSIE’S – 2449 Wilton Drive

JOIN US FOR THE MOVIE OR JUST TO EAT 

 

***************************

United in Anger: A History of ACT UP is an inspiring documentary about the birth and life of the AIDS activist movement from the perspective of the people in the trenches fighting the epidemic. Utilizing oral histories of members of ACT UP, as well as rare archival footage, the film depicts the efforts of ACT UP as it battles corporate greed, social indifference, and government neglect.

 

img_0031

 

 

MEET THE MAN WHO STARTED ACT UP 

LARRY KRAMER  –  MARCH 9 and 10

Buy Tickets Online: http://www.worldaidsmuseum.org

 

54d4cc48-0e30-4c6e-b31b-73db375c052b

The topic this Wednesday February 22, 2017 is Topic: How to Cope With and Recover From a Breakup in Healthy Ways.

We will be watching a talk by a renowned relationship/sexual psychotherapist and discussing how to deal with the many issues one may be faced with when going through a breakup. Is it always the end? Does infidelity mean it’s over? How can we better deal with rejection? Esther Perel walks us through the painful moments of a breakup and provides us with ways to overcome a relationship so that we can move on…

Group will be lead by David Shelton.  Come support him.

The topic this Wednesday February 22, 2017 is Topic: How to Cope With and Recover From a Breakup in Healthy Ways.

We will be watching a talk by a renowned relationship/sexual psychotherapist and discussing how to deal with the many issues one may be faced with when going through a breakup. Is it always the end? Does infidelity mean it’s over? How can we better deal with rejection? Esther Perel walks us through the painful moments of a breakup and provides us with ways to overcome a relationship so that we can move on…

Group will be lead by David Shelton.  Come support him.

POZitive Attitudes & World AIDS Museum

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MOVIE NEWS   

No Friday Movie this week due to limited movie line up. We will be back next week! Contact John at JRamos4000@aol.com with your suggestions.

NOTE: We have been going out to eat before and after the movies on a regular basis and many group guys have been attending. It’s lots of fun, and we’re getting to know each other better as friends too. 

 

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ARTICLES SHARED BY GROUP MEMBERS

“Growing Old with HIV after Decades of Drug Success”

(Article shared by group member Walter D.)

By Leslie Kramer, special to CNBC.com Tuesday, 14 Feb 2017  

The success of breakthrough HIV drugs means one of the biggest challenges in the decades to come will be treating HIV as part of the aging process. More than half of all people with HIV in the United States are over 50, and by 2030 it is estimated that this figure will rise to 70 percent, according to the International Society for Infectious Diseases. Older HIV patients will be in general decline, while also battling conditions caused by decades of HIV drug use.

“This is a new frontier for a lot of us,” said Kelsey Louie, chief executive officer at nonprofit Gay Men’s Health Crisis. “People are living longer with HIV, so we are dealing with things we haven’t had to deal with before, like the long-term effects of medication,” he said. “It’s important to understand that people who are aging will be facing other health issues that will only be complicated by HIV.”

The economic toll of HIV in the U.S. keeps rising. This year federal funding for the disease has reached $27.5 billion. Today there are more than 1.2 million people in the United States living with HIV. More than 700,000 people with AIDS have died since the beginning of the crisis, according to data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2014, there were 12,333 deaths (due to any cause) of people with diagnosed HIV infection ever classified as AIDS, and 6,721 deaths were attributed directly to HIV, according to the CDC. Doctors and drug companies are pursuing new approaches to treatment.

 “We are at a fork in the road,” said Greg Millet, vice president and director of public policy at AIDS nonprofit amfAR, who previously worked on AIDS and aging as a government epidemiologist during the Obama administration. “The fact that people living with HIV are living longer is fantastic news for many of us coming up in the era of the ’80s and ’90s, when it was effectively a death sentence and people did not live beyond five to 10 years,” he said.

FULL STORY CLICK THIS LINK: http://www.cnbc.com/2017/02/14/the-new-hiv-challenge-treating-the-disease-as-a-geriatric-condition.html

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“HEALTH CARE ADVANCE DIRECTIVE”

Article provided by group member Steve S.

The Patient’s Right to Decide

Every competent adult has the right to make decisions concerning his or her own health, including the right to choose or refuse medical treatment.

When a person becomes unable to make decisions due to a physical or mental change, such as being in a coma or developing dementia (like Alzheimer’s disease), they are considered incapacitated. Only your primary physician can determine if you are incapacitated. To make sure that an incapacitated person’s decisions about health care will still be respected, the Florida legislature enacted legislation pertaining to health care advance directives (Chapter 765, Florida Statutes).  The law recognizes the right of a competent adult to make an advance directive instructing his or her physician to provide, withhold, or withdraw life-prolonging procedures; to designate another individual to make treatment decisions if the person becomes unable to make his or her own decisions; and/or to indicate the desire to make an anatomical donation after death. Additionally, the law states that you do not have to be incapacitated to elect a health care surrogate to make your decisions.

By law hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies, hospices, and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are required to provide their patients with written information, such as this pamphlet, concerning health care advance directives.  The state rules that require this include 58A-2.0232, 59A-3.254, 59A-4.106, 59A-8.0245, and 59A-12.013, Florida Administrative Code.

Questions About Health Care Advance Directives

What is an advance directive?

It is a written or oral statement about how you want medical decisions made should you not be able to make them yourself and/or it can express your wish to make an anatomical donation after death.  Some people make advance directives when they are diagnosed with a life-threatening illness.  Others put their wishes into writing while they are healthy, often as part of their estate planning.

Three types of advance directives are:

  • A Living Will
  • A Health Care Surrogate Designation
  • An Anatomical Donation

You might choose to complete one, two, or all three of these forms.  This pamphlet provides information to help you decide what will best serve your needs.

What is a living will?

It is a written or oral statement of the kind of medical care you want or do not want if you become unable to make your own decisions.  It is called a living will because it takes effect while you are still living.  You may wish to speak to your health care provider or attorney to be certain you have completed the living will in a way that your wishes will be understood.

What is a health care surrogate designation?

It is a document naming another person as your representative to make medical decisions for you if you are unable to make them yourself.  You can include instructions about any treatment you want or do not want, similar to a living will.  You can also designate an alternate surrogate.

Which is best?

Depending on your individual needs you may wish to complete any one or a combination of the three types of advance directives.

What is an anatomical donation?

It is a document that indicates your wish to donate, at death, all or part of your body.  This can be an organ and tissue donation to persons in need, or donation of your body for training of health care workers.  You can indicate your choice to be an organ donor by designating it on your driver’s license or state identification card (at your nearest driver’s license office), signing a uniform donor form (seen elsewhere in this pamphlet), or expressing your wish in a living will.

Am I required to have an advance directive under Florida law?

No, there is no legal requirement to complete an advance directive. However, if you have not made an advance directive, decisions about your health care or an anatomical donation may be made for you by a court-appointed guardian, your wife or husband, your adult child, your parent, your adult sibling, an adult relative, or a close friend.

The person making decisions for you may or may not be aware of your wishes.  When you make an advance directive, and discuss it with the significant people in your life, it will better assure that your wishes will be carried out the way you want.

Must an attorney prepare the advance directive?

No, the procedures are simple and do not require an attorney, though you may choose to consult one.

However, an advance directive, whether it is a written document or an oral statement, needs to be witnessed by two individuals.  At least one of the witnesses cannot be a spouse or a blood relative.

Where can I find advance directive forms?

Florida law provides a sample of each of the following forms:  a living will, a health care surrogate, and an anatomical donation.  Elsewhere in this pamphlet we have included sample forms as well as resources where you can find more information and other types of advance directive forms.

Can I change my mind after I write an advance directive?

Yes, you may change or cancel an advance directive at any time. Any changes should be written, signed and dated.  However, you can also change an advance directive by oral statement; physical destruction of the advance directive; or by writing a new advance directive.

If your driver’s license or state identification card indicates you are an organ donor, but you no longer want this designation, contact the nearest driver’s license office to cancel the donor designation and a new license or card will be issued to you.

What if I have filled out an advance directive in another state and need treatment in Florida?

An advance directive completed in another state, as described in that state’s law, can be honored in Florida.

What should I do with my advance directive if I choose to have one?

  • If you designate a health care surrogate and an alternate surrogate be sure to ask them if they agree to take this responsibility, discuss how you would like matters handled, and give them a copy of the document.
  • Make sure that your health care provider, attorney, and the significant persons in your life know that you have an advance directive and where it is located.  You also may want to give them a copy.
  • Set up a file where you can keep a copy of your advance directive (and other important paperwork).  Some people keep original papers in a bank safety deposit box.  If you do, you may want to keep copies at your house or information concerning the location of your safety deposit box.
  • Keep a card or note in your purse or wallet that states that you have an advance directive and where it is located.
  • If you change your advance directive, make sure your health care provider, attorney and the significant persons in your life have the latest copy.

If you have questions about your advance directive you may want to discuss these with your health care provider, attorney, or the significant persons in your life.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE:

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TICKETS NOW ON SALE:

WWW.WORLDAIDSMUSEUM.ORG

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The topic this Wednesday, February 15, 2017 is Valentine’s Day and three things you’d like to get for the holiday.     We will write these down on a piece of paper, then read them anonymously and discuss.