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This Web Site is meant to share information of HIV Gay life in South Florida as we know it. By using this website, you agree that you have read the Website Disclaimer and agree to the exclusions and limitations of liability set out in the Website Disclaimer are reasonable.

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Pozitive Attitudes is a registered name owned and operated by the World AIDS Museum and Educational Center.

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This Wednesday October 29, 2014 we will have a guest speaker, Dick Keiser Jr, PhD on Gay Men’s Health.  His topic will be “What do T-Cell Counts Really Mean”

From New York Times: Click Here

Elton John on the Unfinished Fight Against AIDS – NYTimes.com

These are great advances, and there is no question that those who believe in marriage equality must be vigilant in protecting them. But as engaged as the gay community and civil rights activists have been in the fight for marriage equality, we have lost ground on the fight that so intensely galvanized the gay community to begin with: H.I.V. and AIDS.

We need the same coalition that brought about marriage equality — from gay activists, human rights champions and social justice advocates to legal experts and courageous policy makers — to address the spiraling AIDS crisis again.

Why? Because 30 years after the AIDS epidemic began, rates of infection in the United States are still at unacceptable levels. One in eight gay men is H.I.V.-positive, and yet a majority of gay and bisexual men say they are “not concerned” about H.I.V., according to new research from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Just a third of the men surveyed even knew that H.I.V. infections were increasing in the United States. Thirty percent said they had never been tested, and a majority reported that they hadn’t been tested in the last year, going against recommendations from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Many view the drug Truvada — often used in pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP — as a miracle drug that will end AIDS. I share in this excitement, and have great hope for PrEP — and praise for leaders who advocate its wider use. But only a quarter of those men surveyed by Kaiser had ever even heard of PrEP.

In short, as the gay community celebrates the march of marriage, we are failing to maintain the kind of basic awareness and education that is needed to save lives.

Of course, the continued prevalence of H.I.V. should shake the conscience of all Americans — not just those in the gay community. For example, today AIDS is among the leading causes of death for African-American men.

In the South, new infections are at rates rivaling the 1980s, fueled by a toxic mix of homophobia, poverty and poor choices by policy makers, like the refusal of many Southern governors to expand Medicaid.

What, then, can be done?

Last week my organization, the Elton John AIDS Foundation, announced a series of grants to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organizations to promote testing and prevention, spread awareness and fight anti-H.I.V. stigma. I hope other organizations will join us in identifying the groups at the greatest risk of contracting H.I.V. and working with people in those groups to find stability and hope. And while I hope that groups outside the lesbian and gay community join us, I do believe that those of us within the community have a special obligation.

Finally, as a society we need to learn to view the AIDS crisis with compassion. What helped to win marriage equality were the images of loving couples being given a chance to exercise their humanity and their basic rights. So, too, can telling the stories of those with H.I.V. and AIDS striving to live with dignity help us reach the end of AIDS.

Within just a few decades, we have moved from a nation with laws against consensual sex into a place where members of the gay community can marry, adopt children and expect to live a good life. That’s a wonderful thing, but we have to remember that it’s not the only thing.

I came out publicly in 1976, just before the beginning of the AIDS crisis. The gay community I inhabited in those years never dreamed of marriage equality — we simply wanted to live, and to stop the terrible epidemic that kept killing our loved ones. We’ve come a long way. But as we celebrate these victories, we must also come together and redouble our efforts to end H.I.V. Only then will we truly have won freedom and equality.

ACA

Basics of the ACA Explained SEMINAR ……..
Thursday, November 6 at 5:00pm
The Pride Center in Wilton Manors, Florida

On Tuesday, October 28 at 7:30 PM at Tom Sheaffer’s house he will be showing the second film in a mini-series of gay films, Bridegroom.
Bridegroom
BRIDEGROOM is a documentary directed by Linda Bloodworth-Thomason that tells the emotional journey of Shane Crone and Tom Bridegroom, two young men in a loving and committed relationship that was cut short when Tom was killed in a tragic accident. The story of what happened after this accidental death – of how people without the legal protections of marriage can find themselves completely shut out and ostracized– is poignant, enraging and opens a window onto the issue of marriage equality like no speech or lecture ever will.

On May 7, 2012, the anniversary of Tom’s death, after a year of documenting his own grief, Shane decided to make a video tribute to his partner entitled “It Could Happen To You.” This film, posted on YouTube, received over 3.4 million views and has been translated into over 20 different languages.

There will be soft drinks. Feel free to bring light snacks to share.

PLEASE DO NOT PARK ON THE NEIGHBORS’ LAWNS. THANK YOU.

Tom Sheaffer 1810 NE 41st Street, Oakland Park 33308

Lsheaffer@aol.com. 954 990 4457

This Wednesday October 29, 2014 we will have a guest speaker, Dick Keiser Jr, PhD on Gay Men’s Health.  His topic will be “What do T-Cell Counts Really Mean”

FRIDAY MOVIE (FOR Poz Attitudes Group) – October 24, 2014
FURY  –  Stars Brad Pitt
 5 Star Critic and 4.5 Audience Rating    
Regal Cypress Creek Theatre 
STARTS:  7:25 pm  –  Meet in lobby at 7 PM
Fury (2014)
Synopsis
April, 1945. As the Allies make their final push in the European Theatre, a battle-hardened army sergeant named Wardaddy (Brad Pitt) commands a Sherman tank and her five-man crew on a deadly mission behind enemy lines. Outnumbered and outgunned, and with a rookie soldier thrust into their platoon, Wardaddy and his men face overwhelming odds in their heroic attempts to strike at the heart of Nazi Germany.
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Pozitive Attitudes is part of the
 WORLD AIDS MUSEUM AND EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Event Tickets Available at WWW.worldAIDSmuseum.org  :
$40, $60 and $150* VIP tickets on sale.
* VIP TICKET get Special Seating and Entry to Reception honoring HIV doctors
EventPosterMuseum
On Tuesday, October 28 at 7:30 PM at Tom Sheaffer’s house he will be showing the second film in a mini-series of gay films, Bridegroom.
Bridegroom
BRIDEGROOM is a documentary directed by Linda Bloodworth-Thomason that tells the emotional journey of Shane Crone and Tom Bridegroom, two young men in a loving and committed relationship that was cut short when Tom was killed in a tragic accident. The story of what happened after this accidental death – of how people without the legal protections of marriage can find themselves completely shut out and ostracized– is poignant, enraging and opens a window onto the issue of marriage equality like no speech or lecture ever will.

On May 7, 2012, the anniversary of Tom’s death, after a year of documenting his own grief, Shane decided to make a video tribute to his partner entitled “It Could Happen To You.” This film, posted on YouTube, received over 3.4 million views and has been translated into over 20 different languages.

There will be soft drinks. Feel free to bring light snacks to share.

PLEASE DO NOT PARK ON THE NEIGHBORS’ LAWNS. THANK YOU.

Tom Sheaffer 1810 NE 41st Street, Oakland Park 33308

Lsheaffer@aol.com. 954 990 4457

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