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FRIDAY NIGHT Pozitive Attitudes Group MOVIE:  OCTOBER 3, 2014
 
GONE GIRL Stars Ben Affleck
 
SHOWING :  CYPRESS CREEK REGAL CINEMAS
6415 North Andrews Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
(954) 771-0033
 
STARTS AT:  7:50 PM –  MEET INSIDE LOBBY AT 7:10 PM
 
Movie has 90% Critic Approval
 
 
 
Gone Girl 
 
Gone Girl
rollingstone.com
Gone Girl

2 hr 25 min

Synopsis

GONE GIRL – directed by David Fincher and based upon the global bestseller by Gillian Flynn – unearths the secrets at the heart of a modern marriage. On the occasion of his fifth wedding anniversary, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) reports that his beautiful wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), has gone missing. Under pressure from the police and a growing media frenzy, Nick’s portrait of a blissful union begins to crumble. Soon his lies, deceits and strange behavior have everyone asking the same dark question: Did Nick Dunne kill his wife?
 
 
POZitive Attitudes is part of the WORLD AIDS MUSEUM AND EDUCATIONAL CENTER
WWW.WorldAIDSmuseum.ORG
Volunteer / Donate
 
Untitled

Saturday was Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS awareness day and that will be our topic this Wednesday October 1, 2014. We’ll use this quiz and follow article to discuss awareness:
1) How many sizes of condoms are there?
Regular and large
Many different sizes
One size fits all
2) How effective are male condoms when used correctly?
45%
78%
97%
3) At what point during sex should the condom be put on the penis?
Before the penis is erect (hard)
Just before the point of ejaculation (Cumming) to catch the semen
While erect before there is any contact between the penis and your partner’s body
4) If you wear two condoms it will give you twice as much protection
True
False
5) CDC’s recommendation for sexually active gay and bisexual men with multiple sex partners, or who inject drugs is to get tested:
Every three months
Every six months
Once a year
6) You are three (3) times more likely to acquire HIV if you have an STD
True False
7) You can get HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia and herpes through oral sex
True
False
8) An HIV positive person may not show symptoms for years. The only way for you or your partner to be sure is to get tested.
True
False
9) If I’m receiving treatment and taking my medication, I cannot spread the HIV virus
True
False

Gay and Bisexual Men See HIV as the Top Health Issue Facing Their Community, But Majorities Are Not Personally Worried About Getting Infected & Not Getting Tested Regularly

Most Are Unaware of New Prevention Options, Such as PrEP, or Current Treatment Recommendations

MENLO PARK, CA – More than thirty years into the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and at a time when infections among gay and bisexual men are on the rise in the U.S., a new national survey of gay and bisexual men by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) finds that though HIV/AIDS is named as the number one health issue facing their population, a majority (56%) are not personally concerned about becoming infected, and relatively few report having been tested recently.

Only three in 10 (30%) gay and bisexual men say they were tested for HIV within the last year, including 19 percent who report being tested within the last six months (these figures exclude the 10% who self-identify as HIV-positive). Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are twice as likely as those who are older to report never having been tested for HIV (44% vs. 21%). The CDC recommends at least annual HIV testing for this population with more frequent testing advised by many health departments.

Only about a quarter (26%) know about PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), a daily pill that people who are HIV-negative can take to lower their risk of becoming infected. Eight in 10 (80%) say they have heard “only a little” or “nothing at all” about the new prevention option.

Fewer than half (46%) of gay and bisexual men are aware that the current guidelines for people with HIV are to start antiretroviral (ARV) treatment as soon as they are diagnosed, and only a quarter (25%) know about treatment as prevention. (Research shows that taking consistent ARV treatment can reduce the risk of passing HIV on to others by as much as 96 percent.)

More than half (56%) say that a doctor has never recommended they get tested for HIV, and six in 10 (61%) say they rarely or never discuss HIV when they visit their doctor.

“These survey results underscore the importance of getting the word out among gay and bisexual men about risk and new treatment and prevention options,” said Kaiser Family Foundation President and CEO Drew Altman, Ph.D.

Just a third (32%) realize that new infections are on the rise among gay and bisexual men. One in four (22%) think the number is decreasing and the rest either think the situation is staying the same or acknowledge that they don’t know.

Reflecting the disproportionate impact of HIV in communities of color, gay and bisexual men who are members of racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to say that HIV/AIDS is a significant issue for them personally than white gay men (64% versus 42%) and to say that they are personally concerned about becoming infected (53% versus 28%).

Overall, three quarters (75%) say that gay and bisexual men not knowing their HIV status is a major reason it has been hard to control the spread of HIV among this group. Complacency about HIV in the gay community (62%) and HIV-related stigma (56 percent) are also named by majorities as major factors.

Many say HIV is not a topic that comes up often, if all, even with those closest to them. Three quarters (68%) say they “rarely” or “never” discuss HIV with friends, and large shares report not talking much about the disease with casual sexual partners (50%) or with long-term partners (60%).

While most gay and bisexual men (76%) say they are comfortable having non-sexual relationships with HIV-positive persons, large majorities say they would be uncomfortable with more intimate relationships, including being in a long-term sexual relationship (66%) and having casual sex (77%) with someone who is HIV-positive. Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are more likely to say they would be uncomfortable having relationships, sexual or otherwise, with someone who is HIV-positive. Nearly two in five (37%) gay and bisexual men who did not identify as HIV-positive themselves say they have decided not to pursue a sexual relationship specifically because the person was HIV-positive.

Just over half (53%) report being in a committed relationship, including one in five (20%) who say they are married. Twelve percent live in a household with at least one child under the age of 18.

Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are less likely to report personal connections to HIV than those who are older. Nearly half (47%) of gay and bisexual men 35 and older say they have lost someone close to them to the disease, compared to only 8 percent of those who are younger. Overall, half (49%) of gay and bisexual men say they personally know someone living with HIV and one in three (32 percent) have had someone close to them who has died.

The AIDS Institute has reached out concerning an amicus brief that is being prepared on the Halbig case (the issue before the court in this case is whether premium tax credits within federal marketplace states were lawful or not). They want to include in the amicus some stories to demonstrate the severe impact on people with HIV/AIDS if the court decided that the premium tax credits were unlawful.

Specifically, the AIDS Institute is looking to identify an individual, or several, who:
1. is/are living with HIV or AIDS,
2. have purchased health insurance through the Florida Marketplace,
3. qualify for subsides on ACA plan purchases, by Premium Tax Credits and/or Cost Sharing Reductions,
4. are willing to publically shared her/his experiences by inclusion in an amicus brief

Patients or their advocates should feel free to contact The AIDS Institute’s state policy analyst – Jesse Fry – at (850) 339-6395 or via email: jfry@theaidsinstitute.org (I’m copying Jesse on this e-mail). Of course, they can always contact me directly with any questions or concerns.

The time frame on this is short, so they ideally need to connect patients to lawyers by Oct. 9. Thanks for any help you can provide on this!
Best regards,
Vicki A. Tucci, Esq.
Lead Navigator
Healthcare Access Partnership Initiative (HAPI)
Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County, Inc.
423 Fern Street, Suite 200
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (561) 655-8944, ext. 252
Cellular Phone; (561) 859-9128
Facsimile: (561) 655-5269
website: legalaidpbc.org
vtucci@legalaidpbc.org

Saturday was Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS awareness day and that will be our topic this Wednesday October 1, 2014. We’ll use this quiz and follow article to discuss awareness:
1) How many sizes of condoms are there?
Regular and large
Many different sizes
One size fits all
2) How effective are male condoms when used correctly?
45%
78%
97%
3) At what point during sex should the condom be put on the penis?
Before the penis is erect (hard)
Just before the point of ejaculation (Cumming) to catch the semen
While erect before there is any contact between the penis and your partner’s body
4) If you wear two condoms it will give you twice as much protection
True
False
5) CDC’s recommendation for sexually active gay and bisexual men with multiple sex partners, or who inject drugs is to get tested:
Every three months
Every six months
Once a year
6) You are three (3) times more likely to acquire HIV if you have an STD
True False
7) You can get HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia and herpes through oral sex
True
False
8) An HIV positive person may not show symptoms for years. The only way for you or your partner to be sure is to get tested.
True
False
9) If I’m receiving treatment and taking my medication, I cannot spread the HIV virus
True
False

Gay and Bisexual Men See HIV as the Top Health Issue Facing Their Community, But Majorities Are Not Personally Worried About Getting Infected & Not Getting Tested Regularly

Most Are Unaware of New Prevention Options, Such as PrEP, or Current Treatment Recommendations

MENLO PARK, CA – More than thirty years into the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and at a time when infections among gay and bisexual men are on the rise in the U.S., a new national survey of gay and bisexual men by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) finds that though HIV/AIDS is named as the number one health issue facing their population, a majority (56%) are not personally concerned about becoming infected, and relatively few report having been tested recently.

Only three in 10 (30%) gay and bisexual men say they were tested for HIV within the last year, including 19 percent who report being tested within the last six months (these figures exclude the 10% who self-identify as HIV-positive). Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are twice as likely as those who are older to report never having been tested for HIV (44% vs. 21%). The CDC recommends at least annual HIV testing for this population with more frequent testing advised by many health departments.

Only about a quarter (26%) know about PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), a daily pill that people who are HIV-negative can take to lower their risk of becoming infected. Eight in 10 (80%) say they have heard “only a little” or “nothing at all” about the new prevention option.

Fewer than half (46%) of gay and bisexual men are aware that the current guidelines for people with HIV are to start antiretroviral (ARV) treatment as soon as they are diagnosed, and only a quarter (25%) know about treatment as prevention. (Research shows that taking consistent ARV treatment can reduce the risk of passing HIV on to others by as much as 96 percent.)

More than half (56%) say that a doctor has never recommended they get tested for HIV, and six in 10 (61%) say they rarely or never discuss HIV when they visit their doctor.

“These survey results underscore the importance of getting the word out among gay and bisexual men about risk and new treatment and prevention options,” said Kaiser Family Foundation President and CEO Drew Altman, Ph.D.

Just a third (32%) realize that new infections are on the rise among gay and bisexual men. One in four (22%) think the number is decreasing and the rest either think the situation is staying the same or acknowledge that they don’t know.

Reflecting the disproportionate impact of HIV in communities of color, gay and bisexual men who are members of racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to say that HIV/AIDS is a significant issue for them personally than white gay men (64% versus 42%) and to say that they are personally concerned about becoming infected (53% versus 28%).

Overall, three quarters (75%) say that gay and bisexual men not knowing their HIV status is a major reason it has been hard to control the spread of HIV among this group. Complacency about HIV in the gay community (62%) and HIV-related stigma (56 percent) are also named by majorities as major factors.

Many say HIV is not a topic that comes up often, if all, even with those closest to them. Three quarters (68%) say they “rarely” or “never” discuss HIV with friends, and large shares report not talking much about the disease with casual sexual partners (50%) or with long-term partners (60%).

While most gay and bisexual men (76%) say they are comfortable having non-sexual relationships with HIV-positive persons, large majorities say they would be uncomfortable with more intimate relationships, including being in a long-term sexual relationship (66%) and having casual sex (77%) with someone who is HIV-positive. Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are more likely to say they would be uncomfortable having relationships, sexual or otherwise, with someone who is HIV-positive. Nearly two in five (37%) gay and bisexual men who did not identify as HIV-positive themselves say they have decided not to pursue a sexual relationship specifically because the person was HIV-positive.

Just over half (53%) report being in a committed relationship, including one in five (20%) who say they are married. Twelve percent live in a household with at least one child under the age of 18.

Gay and bisexual men under the age of 35 are less likely to report personal connections to HIV than those who are older. Nearly half (47%) of gay and bisexual men 35 and older say they have lost someone close to them to the disease, compared to only 8 percent of those who are younger. Overall, half (49%) of gay and bisexual men say they personally know someone living with HIV and one in three (32 percent) have had someone close to them who has died.

 image1

click here: http://flglff.com/

Festival Members have an exclusive advanced purchase period beginning September 19, 2014 – September 25, 2014. General Public tickets will go on sale September 26, 2014. Tickets may be purchased 24 hours a day online or by calling us M-F from 10am to 6pm at (305) 751-6305. Those members entitled to advanced complimentary tickets as part of their membership benefits may be able to order them online or by phone beginning September 19, 2014. Tickets may be printed online or picked up at Will Call.

REGULAR SCREENING ADVANCE TICKETS AVERAGE $12.00 (members $10.50)

BOX OFFICE TICKETS $13.50 (members $11.50)

Movie often sell out in advance, so buy early.

image2

TO SEE ENTIRE MOVIE LINE UP VISIT:  http://flglff.com/

 EVENTS :

Friday October 10th

FILMMAKERS SOIRÉE

Museum Of Art Fort Lauderdale

1 E. Las Olas Blvd. Fort Lauderdale FL 33301
THIS IS A PRODUCERS CIRCLE ONLY EVENT

8:00pm – 10:00pm

OPENING NIGHT FILM – FOUR MOONS

Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale

1 E. Las Olas Blvd. Fort Lauderdale FL 33301

FOUR MOONS (CUATRO LUNAS)

U.S. PREMIERE 

Four stories of love, heartbreak and self-acceptance between men of different generations as they face their conflicts and their fears. An 11 year-old boy feels attracted to his male cousin. Two college students start a relationship that gets complicated as one of them refuses to come out. A long-lasting male relationship is in serious trouble when one feels attracted to somebody else. An old, family man is obsessed with a young male prostitute and tries to raise the
money to afford him.

FILMMAKERS AND TALENT EXPECTED TO ATTEND

JOIN US AFTER THE FILM FOR THE OPENING NIGHT EVENT
1 E Las Olas Blvd, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 10:00 – 12:00 PM

http://postimage.org/

10:00pm – 12:00am

OPENING NIGHT PARTY

Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale

1 E. Las Olas Blvd. Fort Lauderdale FL 33301

Saturday October 11th

8:30pm – 11:30pm

AFTER FILM GAYTHERING

Rumors Bar & Grill

2426 Wilton Dr. Wilton Manors FL 33305

Sunday October 12th

8:30pm – 11:30pm

MEET & GREET W/ SOUTH BEACH ON HEELS DIRECTOR & DRAG QUEENS

TBA

TBA

Thursday October 16th

7:30pm – 9:30pm

CENTERPIECE FILM – BEYOND LOVE

The Classic Gateway Theatre

1820 E. Sunrise Blvd. Fort Lauderdale FL 33304

Friday October 17th

10:00pm – 12:00am

LADIES NIGHT

America’s Backyard

100 SW 3rd Ave. Fort Lauderdale FL 33312

Saturday October 18th

10:00pm – 12:00am

COCKTAILS IN THE COURTYARD

Cinema Paradiso

503 SE 6th st. Fort Lauderdale FL 33301

Sunday October 19th

7:00pm – 9:00pm

WOMEN’S CLOSING FILM – APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR 

Cinema Paradiso

503 SE 6th st. Fort Lauderdale FL 33301

7:30pm – 9:30pm

MEN’S CLOSING FILM – QUEEN OF AMSTERDAM

The Classic Gateway Theatre

1820 E Sunrise Blvd. Fort Lauderdale FL 33304

- John Ramos
 
 

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 s-BLACK-HIV-large640

 Only Half Of Gay And Bisexual Men With HIV Are Getting The Care They Need
Anna Almendrala 09/26/2014   HUFFINGTON POST

We’ve got some of the most powerful antiretroviral HIV drugs at our disposal, capable of preventing AIDS and prolonging life to near-normal expectancy, but they’re only reaching a fraction of the people who need it.

A disturbing report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that only about half of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in the United States are receiving treatment. And only 42 percent had achieved viral suppression, or the point at which there are such low levels of the virus in the blood that the chance of passing it on to others is greatly reduced. Only 77.5 percent of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men were linked to some kind of HIV health care within three months of diagnosis.

“The most powerful tool for protecting the health of people living with HIV and preventing new HIV infections is really only reaching a fraction of the men who need it,” said Richard Wolitski, Ph.D., an expert on HIV among gay and bisexual men, as well as a senior advisor in the CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. “The goal of HIV treatment is for everyone to achieve viral suppression.”

The report was compiled from 2010 data and will serve as a baseline for future surveys, explained Wolitski. So while it can’t tell us whether these rates are an improvement or a regression from years past, the number of people getting treatment is still too low — especially considering that almost everyone with HIV who takes antiretroviral drugs can achieve suppression.

“The treatments that we have available today are so much more effective and so much easier to take than the medications that were available early in the HIV epidemic,” Wolitski told The Hufington Post. “HIV has really become a health condition that can be treated and monitored effectively if the right care is given and started early.”

The rates are especially troubling for young people and for men of color. When the data is split up by race, only 37 percent of black gay and bisexual men have achieved viral suppression, as opposed to 44 percent of white and 42 percent of Latino gay and bisexual men.

Analyzed by age, 25.9 percent of gay and bisexual men ages 18 to 24 achieved viral suppression, as opposed to 42 percent of the overall population.

There are a lot of obstacles that can block men from their medicine, including lack of experience with the health care system, no family support and stigma that could make men afraid to reveal their HIV status to their support networks. All these factors make it more difficult to keep up with the demands of biannual check-ups and daily medication (usually pills). Mental health issues and substance abuse problems could also prevent men from accessing the drugs they need.

But the primary barriers are poverty and lack of insurance, despite the fact that HIV drugs are covered by Medicaid and federal funds are available through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program, which fills in funding gaps that aren’t covered by Medicaid or private health insurance.

The Affordable Care Act could also end up making a significant dent in these numbers. In a report released last January, the Kaiser Family Foundation estimated that of the 407,000 people with HIV who are already linked to health care, 70,000 are estimated to be uninsured. But because of the health care act, 23,000 would gain coverage through the insurance marketplace, while 46,910 more would become eligible for expanded Medicaid — provided that all states sign up for expanded Medicaid. As of September, only 27 states and the District of Columbia plan to participate.

As for the estimated 700,000 people with HIV who aren’t linked to care yet, the Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that ACA changes could mean health coverage for an additional 124,000 more people.

In Chicago, rates of HIV infection have jumped among gay and bisexual men under 30, mostly among black men. To close the HIV treatment gap and prevent more infections, advocacy groups and governmental organizations have to work together, said Simone Koehlinger, senior vice president of programming at AIDS Foundation of Chicago.

“For states like Illinois where Medicaid has expanded, you want to make sure that the Medicaid managed care plans continue to cover services that are needed, that formularies are covering the effective HIV drugs and that people who were perhaps not covered for many years … understand [how to navigate] the health care system,” said Koehlinger in a phone interview with HuffPost.

As important as funding, though, are programs that continue to provide cross-cultural education about HIV/AIDS to decrease stigma around the disease, something that the AIDS Foundation of Chicago has done since its founding in 1985. Among its other priorities are advocating on behalf of patients to keep medications affordable, educating HIV/AIDS clients about their medication options, and training health care providers on how to bridge cultural divides about the disease.

 

POZitive Attitudes is part of the World AIDS Museum and Educational Center

VISIT, VOLUNTEER & DONATE:  WWW.WorldAIDSmuseum.Org

Franks logo

Just days after President Obama warned the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is a “growing threat to regional and global security,” the World Health Organization has released a report showing just how fast the deadly virus is growing.

The deadly virus has taken more than 3,000 lives according to the most recent WHO report, up from only 2,400 deaths at the beginning of September.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 1.4 million people in Liberia and Sierra Leone could be affected by January, but there are some signs of hope.

CNN visited an Ebola isolation unit in Liberia where a doctor has successfully been treating patients with an HIV drug called lamivudine (3TC).

Dr. Gobee Logan has tried the drug on 15 patients, according to the CNN. So far, only two have died, which is noteworthy because this Ebola outbreak has typically seen death rates far higher than 50 percent.
To read full article CLICK HERE

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